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Are You A Minimalist or A Maximalist Home Buyer?

Most, if not all, homeowners place a high value on their home’s appearance. Aside from the impressive design itself, a home’s aesthetics reveals one’s personality and identity. For sure, you have wondered whether you’re a minimalist or a maximalist as you select the home that best accommodates your needs. 

For one, intention and simplicity are the hallmarks of minimalism, whereas creativity and comfort are the defining characteristics of maximalism. There’s no need to take a personality test to determine which of the two you are. Just keep on reading to find out!

Minimalism

After dissatisfaction with Abstract Expressionism and a belief that art should not allude to anything other than itself, the Minimalist movement was born. The modern design business quickly adopted it as a lifestyle and embraced the movement’s core values: simplicity in both form and function. 

Minimalists strive to reduce their “footprint” both aesthetically and residentially. In a large house, the walls will be empty save for a modest piece of art. Rooms will be vacant save for a few essential pieces of furniture.

The upkeep of a minimalist’s home is relatively simple. This is because minimalists often select materials that don’t need to be constantly maintained or repaired. Every aspect is kept simple and clear. 

The futuristic white-walled scapes of your favorite science fiction stories often come to mind when you hear about minimalism.

Maximalism

Maximalism isn’t about overindulgence and clutter, as some people believe. However, the visuals can be a lot busier and fill all of the space. Its bold patterns and colors show off its bold ingenuity in a beautiful way. 

Additionally, there is a wide range of designs to choose from in this style. Color, pattern, texture, and accessory randomization play a vital role in the design. It’s a far cry from minimalism in every way. 

It is the goal of a maximalist to “maximize” what they already have. In a little house, every surface will be covered in something beautiful. Generally, maximalist designs tend to be more expensive, but they are more communicative, appealing to the eye, and “fun” to look at. 

Signs that You Lean Toward Minimalism

It can be difficult for a minimalist to feel at ease in a busy environment with so many colors. Rooms decorated in gray, black, or white will make you feel more at ease. 

It’s important to choose simple and easy colors to keep up with. Moreover, you’d rather have a sparse yet well-executed design.

Only a small closet for clothes may be adequate for a minimalist. Theirs is a desire to minimize the things that define their lives.

You’d like more control over your day-to-day activities. Freedom means a lot for minimalists. For many, freedom means having less stuff, less responsibility, and more money to spend on new and exciting adventures. 

You desire more breathing space. A bigger house is an option, but so is purging your home of unnecessary items. You’re probably a minimalist if you picked the latter.

Signs that You Lean Toward Maximalism

A maximalist, according to psychology, perceives order amid chaos. They tend to buy things they don’t really need and display them as artifacts. Maximalists tend to have positive and energetic personalities. 

This design is all about bringing life and stories into their homes. A collection of souvenirs from their trips, for example, is one of their favorite elements to include in their homes. They can enjoy it when they bring everything they want into their home. 

As a maximalist, you want to keep and expand your collection of belongings. There is no doubt that you would like to have additional space in your home. And who wouldn’t? But you’re not willing to give up your stuff to get it. It’s the furthest thing from your mind. You enjoy the things you already own and would like to expand your collection in the future.

Furniture Solutions

A minimalist’s motto is to keep things simple, so there are only a few pieces of furniture in each room of a minimalist home. Additionally, there is a lack of utilization of space. Kitchen cabinets can be straightforward and unadorned, whereas the bedrooms may include a bed and possibly even a vanity for the owner’s personal effects.

On the other hand, besides necessities like furniture, maximalists decorate their homes with ornaments and other accessories. Rooms will appear crowded, but there’s no need to fear that the rooms will become messy. The opposite will be true, with everything perfectly arranged in its proper position. 

In addition to a bed, a bedroom may include a nightstand, television cabinets, a writing desk, and plant pots. The kitchen will even have RTA (ready-to-assemble) kitchen cabinets for a unique design.

Color Choice

Appearance is greatly influenced by color. As soon as you arrive at a new location, you notice it immediately. 

A minimalist prefers neutral colors to bright ones. Moreover, they prefer the walls and furniture to be bare. Because the color choice is so light, the rooms appear drab and uninspiring. There may be no more than one photograph on the wall at a time. However, don’t be fooled by this! A clean and refined minimalist aesthetic is not dull; it’s simply making the most out of less. If you’re trying to focus on the most important things in life, this style is definitely for you.

Conversely, a maximalist would rather use bright hues. A maximalist’s home will be filled with brightly colored walls and furniture. The rooms are filled with various hues that appear to tell a tale. The walls of a maximalist’s home might be adorned with various paintings and photographs.

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